Map Collection

Emancipation of European Jewry.  (Source: A Teacher’s Guide to the Holocaust, produced by Florida Center for Instructional Technology, College of Education, University of South Florida, 2005)

Austro-Hungarian Empire
Artaria Railway and Postal Communications Map of Austria-Hungary, 1887.

Austro-Hungarian Empire, 1898

Cram’s Railway System Atlas of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy, 1901.

Belarus
Baltic and Belorussian Lands Annexed by the Russian Empire, 1721-1807, including the partitions of Poland (1772-1795)  (Source: Patricia Kennedy Grimstead, Archives and Manuscript Repositories in the USSR-Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Belorussia, Princeton, 1981)

Belarus – White Russia 1882.
(Source: Foundation for East European Family History Studies; from Blackie & Sons Atlas (Edinburgh, 1882), Scale: 1:6,100,000 (or one inch equals about 96 miles)

Prerevolutionary Provincial Organization under the Russian Empire in the Baltic and Belorussian Areas (Late 19thC to 1917).  (Source: Patricia Kennedy Grimstead, Archives and Manuscript Repositories in the USSR-Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Belorussia, Princeton, 1981)

Galicia
Galicia, 1882. (Source: Foundation for East European Family History Studies; from Blackie & Sons Atlas (Edinburgh, 1882), Scale: 1:2,700,000 (or one inch = about 42 miles)

Kornman Road, Rail & Waterway Transport Map of Galicia & Bukovina, 1890.

Lithuania
Sites of Prewar Jewish Residence in Lithuania.  (Source: Vilna Gaon Jewish State Museum, 2000-2008)

Poland
The Duchy of Warsaw in 1809 and Congress Poland in 1815. (Source: Poland: A Country Study.  Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress)

Independent Poland, 1920-1939. (Source: Poland: A Country Study. Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress)

Kielce and Radom Gubernias with powiat (district) divisions, 1867-1917.

Map of Jewish Heritage in Poland.  (Source: Warsaw : Polish Tourist Organisation, c2001)

Poland 1921-1929 with Administrative Districts. (Source: Polish Genealogical Society of America)

Ukraine
Russia, Ukraine, 1882. (Source: Foundation for East European Family History Studies; from Blackie & Sons Atlas (Edinburgh, 1882), Scale: 1:6,100,000 (or one inch equals about 96 miles)